Why Buy Gold? - Canadian Gold Silver

“We have gold because we cannot trust Governments.”

President Herbert Hoover

The symbol of kings and the treasure of nations, desired by all but possessed by few, gold has been cherished for all of recorded history. In the 5th century B.C., Aristotle pondered the question of the perfect medium for money. He concluded that gold is perfect money for 5 reasons:

  • Durability

    Gold won’t rot, break, crumble, decay, corrode or tarnish. Gold is unaffected by air, water, and even most acids.

  • Convenience and portability

    A lifetime of wealth will fit in your pocket.

  • Divisibility

    Gold can easily be divided into smaller amounts. An ounce of gold can be split 100 or even 1000 times.

  • Consistency

    One ounce of pure gold is exactly the same as any other ounce, enabling worldwide trade and liquidity of gold – unlike unique items of jewelry or artwork.

  • Demand

    Gold has a staggering variety of uses, even more today than in Aristotle’s time. Its unique properties keep the demand high and the relative scarcity of the metal insures continued value.

  • Demand

    Gold has a staggering variety of uses, even more today than in Aristotle’s time. Its unique properties keep the demand high and the relative scarcity of the metal insures continued value.

    Gold is still perfect money, perhaps more perfect money than money. Gold remains the time-honored standard of wealth that no other currency can match.

  • Gold Historical Background

    Gold has a long and complex history. From gold’s first discovery, it has symbolized wealth and guaranteed power. Gold has caused obsession in men and nations, destroyed some cultures and gave power to others.

The oldest pieces of gold jewelry Egyptian jewelry were found in the tomb of Queen Zer and that of Queen Pu-abi of Ur in Sumeria and are the oldest examples found of any kind of jewelry in a find from the third millennium BC.
Over the centuries, most of the Egyptian tombs were raided, but the tomb of Tutankhamen was discovered undisturbed by modern archaeologists. Inside the largest collection of gold and jewelry in the world was found and included a gold coffin whose quality showed the advanced state of Egyptian craftsmanship and goldworking (second millennium BC).

The Persian Empire, in what is now Iran, made frequent use of Gold in artwork as part of the religion of Zoroastrianism. Persian goldwork is most famous for its animal art, which was modified after the Arabs conquered the area in the 7th century AD.

When Rome began to flourish, the city attracted talented Gold artisans who created gold jewelry of wide variety. The use of gold in Rome later expanded into household items and furniture in the homes of the higher classes. By the third century AD, the citizens of Rome wore necklaces that contained coins with the image of the emperor. As Christianity spread through the European continent, Europeans ceased burying their dead with their jewelry. As a result, few gold items survive from the Middle Ages, except those of royalty and from church hoards.

In the Americas, the skill of Pre-Columbian cultures in the use of Gold was highly advanced long before the arrival of the Spanish. Indian goldsmiths had mastered most of the techniques known by their European contemporaries when the Spanish arrived. They were adept at filigree, granulation, pressing and hammering, inlay and lost-wax methods. The Spanish conquerors melted down most of the gold that they took from the peoples of this region and most of the remaining examples have come from modern excavations of grave sites. The greatest deposits of gold from these times were in the Andes and in Columbia.

During the frontier days of the United States news of the discovery of gold in a region could result in thousands of new settlers, many risking their lives to find gold. Gold rushes occurred in many of the Western States, the most famous occurring in California at Sutter’s Mill in 1848. Elsewhere, gold rushes happened in Australia in 1851, South Africa in 1884 and in Canada in 1897.

The rise of a gold standard was meant to stabilize the global economy, dictating that a nation must limit its issued currency to the amount of gold it held in reserve. Great Britain was the first to adopt the gold standard in 1821, followed, in the 1870s, by the rest of Europe followed. The system remained in effect until the end of the first world war, after which the US was the only country still honoring the Gold Standard. After the war, other countries were allowed to keep reserves of major currencies instead of gold. The arrival of the great depression marked the end of the U.S. export of gold in the 1930s. By mid 20th century, the US dollar had replaced gold in international trade.

The American Eagle Bullion program was launched in 1986 with the sale of gold and silver bullion coins. Platinum was added to the American Eagle Bullion family in 1997. A bullion coin is a coin that is valued by its weight in a specific precious metal.

Gold Uses

Gold is an ancient metal of wealth, commerce and beauty, but it also has a number of unique properties that make it invaluable to industy. These properties include:

  • Resistance to corrosion
  • Electrical conductivity
  • Ductility and malleability
  • Infrared (heat) reflectivity
  • Thermal conductivity

Gold’s superior electrical conductivity, malleability, and resistance to corrosion have made it vital in components used in a wide range of electronic products and equipment, including computers, telephones, cellular phones, and home appliances.

Gold has extraordinarily high reflective powers that are relied upon in the shielding that protects spacecrafts and satellites from solar radiation and in industrial and medical lasers that use gold-coated reflectors to focus light energy. And because gold is biologically inactive, it has become a vital tool for medical research and is even used in the direct treatment of arthritis and other intractable diseases.

The demand for gold in industry is steady and growing. The supply of gold from stored inventory and from mining operations is limited and will remain so. Demand from investors who want to posses this precious metal is steady, and increases during periods of world crises or instability. The result is a market with much more upside potential than down.

Gold is an excellent hedge against inflation, and protects earnings for the future. Modern investors can invest in gold the traditional way — by purchasing gold bullion in the form of bars or coins — or they can trade in gold or gold futures electronically, or by investing in gold mining or refining companies.

I strongly advise you to take possession of real gold and silver, at anywhere near today’s prices, while you still can. The fundamentals indicate rising prices for decades to come, and a major price spike can happen at any time.